Add more bike types, like "Single-Speed" and "Track Bike"

Request to expand on Bike types available in the "Gear" section of Account Settings on Strava.

Requests include:

-Track Bike

-Single Speed

-Hipster Bike

-Commute Bike

-Unicycle

 

To vote for filtered Segment Leaderboard results by bike type, go here.

332

Opmerkingen

197 opmerkingen
  • Would be nice to see kickbike/footbike/scooter as a category as I have to upload my kickbike activities as a ride and it is closer to running than riding but the speed is faster and I would take out a lot of runners KOM's (heart rate and kj output is similar to running)

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  • While parsing bike types can get insane, I would like a "track" or "fixed gear" filter/setting to better compare my riding to others on my route.  Like many people I'm an urban rider on a fixed gear bike.  With 46x17 gearing I can never approach 25 mph average speeds.  tnx.

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  • I'm a fixed gear road cyclist and I find the lack of single speed , fixed gear, and track bikes very frustrating.
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  • +1 for adding support for fixed gear / single speed bikes. Not saying that none of the other suggestions should be added (they should) but as a fixed-only rider that's what I'd like to see most. Being able to put in my ratio/gear inches to calculate cadence, etc. would be nice.

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  • There are just too many kinds of bikes to fairly represent each one as a classification. Moreover, the classifications are constantly evolving. What I'd like to see is simply the ability to click on somebody's bike and see the details of their gear. I like entering the information about my gear, retiring components, entering new ones, etc. But as far as I can tell, it is currently a private thing. I would like to share it.

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  • I agree that there are too many permutations to include everybody's cycling eccentricities, but I suppose there are a few more common groups (Road, Off-road, Fixie, S/S) and it's finding the point at which one 'draws the line' if one draws the line at all.  Who wants to be MTB-KOM on a section of road that would clearly be more quickly ridden on a road bike?  It's pointless isn't it?  And it could dilute the simplicity of Strava.

    Some of these issues could be overcome by a few global 'clubs' which members can join (for example the club 'Unicyclists'), but there would have to be a setting so that only rides on one's unicycle would classify when filtering the KOM listings.  That wouldn't apply to fixie riders because they wouldn't be seen dead on a bike with gears! ;-)

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  • Here's some data that motivates my interest in this topic:

    I made a segment on a local downhill trail to track my unicycle descent times.  Some of the switchbacks are quite sharp and are difficult to ride through, so I typically fall one or more times during the descent.  With a 24" unicycle, I'm limited to about 6-8MPH, so comparing my times to mountain bike riders is obviously ridiculous.

    Check out the leaderboard on this segment:
    http://app.strava.com/segments/1247282

    I'm way at the bottom with a nearly 12-minute time, while the fast mountain bikers are running less than 6-minute descents.

    My recent 12-minute descent is a substantial improvement over my initially 17-minute ride, but no matter how fast I ride on my one wheel, I'll always be in last place compared to the mountain bikers. 

    Here is data showing my progression of times, which is entirely masked by the unequal bike-type comparison:
    http://www.unicyclist.com/forums/showthread.php?t=97680

    I like Kevin Barton's list of bike types, which are hopefully sufficient to fairly segment the rides by achievable performance.

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  • I'm hearing a lot of "There are too many bikes!" 

     

    All you need is a generic, vague, bike type.

     

    Road

    Mountain

    Track

    Time Trial

    Unicycle

    so on and so forth. 

     

    You do not need:

     

    Road

    Single speed

    Fixie

    Track

    Mountain

    SS Mountain

    Time Trial

    Unicycle

     

    Do you see what I mean? 

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  • Hmm - it's the "so on and so forth" bit that's the problem - where to draw the line.  That's what's being discussed here.

    I ride CX for off road and not mountain bike, so there's some segments where my bike will be an advantage and some where it will be a disadvantage.

    On road I only ride fixed and so similarly there are segment pros and cons. Single speed has some advantages over fixed and visa versa.

    Recumbents are faster on flat sections but not as good on hills.

    Time trial is a sub-section of road bikes - where does one become the other?

    Personally, I'm not fussed about categorising bike types because I choose to ride fixed and I guess I'm just not competitive about comparing myself to other fixers.  I do however like to stand my own against road bikes on segments where I can!

    Mujahid A. - I guess it's pretty rare that you'll be able to compare your unicycle downhill time against another unicyclist's?  You have to admit that you've chosen a pretty niche steed!  When does one man's niche become more important (and therefore included in the categories) than another's?

    I think if Strava surveyed a cross section of users to establish some percentages of bike types, they'll pretty quickly come up with the prime candidates for categories - and I doubt unicycle will be up there.  'Track' won't be too high either, whereas fixed and single speed, I'll wager, will have quite significant and separate followings.  

    That would be the only way to solve it - present us with percentages.

    And then we'll argue about discuss where to draw the percentage line!

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  • I'd just be happy about a category "other".  I wanted to record what I do on my folder, and differentiate that from my road bike, so it's showing up as a MTB.  I'd rather leave type blank.

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  • All this talk about bike type categories wouldn't necessary we were just able to select the bike types that we wanted to include in search results or segment comparisons. The list of bike types should still include all the options SS, MTB, Road, Uni, Fixy, CX, etc and you would just select all the type to include.  If you were forces to select just one category and sub category you wouldn't be able to compare types like CX and MTB when both of these frequently compete in the same event class.

    Anyhow, good conversation on the topic.

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  • Strava Cycling is meant for serious cyclists. Serious cyclists do not ride fixies, they ride track bikes. So, no fixies.

    A single speed is just another type of road bike or mtn bike. It's like having a mtn bike with a disk brake instead of calipers, it doesn't change the ride so much that you should call it another bike type. So, no S/S.


    Here's the list of bikes I think should be available to choose from as options.


    -Road

    -Cyclocross

    -Mountain

    -Track

    -Time Trial (totally different geometry from road bikes)

    -Unicycle (which isn't totally necessary, but some people take it seriously)

     

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  • Jesse, really?  you don't see a difference between a SS mtb or geared but you're going to distinguish between Road and TT?   Sorry, I agree with the other stuff but not that  Road and TT need to be separated.

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  • You can make a geared mtn bike S/S. you can not make a road bike into a time trial bike. The geometry of the frames are just so different.
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  • Jesse - Come on!  I regard myself as a serious cyclist.  I ride sportives, audaxes, time-trials, cyclo-cross and international touring as well as track riding at the velodrome.

    I use a track bike at the velodrome, I use a fixed wheel bike (aka 'fixie') for all my road based riding except touring and I use a CX bike for CXing.

    I would not use a track bike on the road because, a) It has tubular velodrome specific tyres, b) it has non-cartridge bearing hubs which for winter riding would spoil in weeks, c) the geometry and bar-type are just too uncomfortable for anything over 40 miles (let alone 100+ mile sportives), there's a minimum bottom bracket height for track bikes that don't suit all road riders and it doesn't have brakes, which where I live in the Cotswolds, UK, would be suicide.  It's a serious bike and many serious cyclist ride bikes like mine.  Mine was custom made by Argos in Bristol, UK from Reynolds 753 tubing. That's serious!

    A track bike is what you ride on the track. A fixie is a fixed gear bike that you ride on the road.  It can be a track frame assigned to road riding and many trendy urban riders will do just that, but then just as many will use a converted old road frame or many of the fixed wheel bikes on the market which are definitely not track legal.  Don't forget that all serious road bikes were 'fixies' before derailleurs were invented and they were definitely not 'track bikes'.

    And to say that S/S doesn't make much difference - what planet?!  Have you ridden S/S in a bunch on the road?!  Or on a cross-country single-track.  It's a very different ride and in no way comparable to the difference between brake types.  

    I think the number of 'serious cyclist' that have bothered to comment on this discussion in support of a S/S or fixed category should persuade you to change your views. 

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  • Like I said earlier, you should be able to select as few or as many different bike types you want to compare your rides to.  This allows the list of bikes types to include as many flavors as one can think of and each rider can choose how they want to group them.

    Thanks for all the input Kevin.  You do indeed know your stuff.

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  • I'm inclined to agree Bryan.  If Strava do indeed implement a bike selection option, I think they have two options:

    - List every bike type imaginable so as not to leave any 'serious' niche-bike riders out in the cold, or

    - Try to hone it down to some realistic threshold of commonness.

    The risk of the first is leaving someone out and the risk of the second is leaving more out and getting into long discussions about where to draw the line and whether to combine types, for example, fixed wheel and single speed, into one category.

    And upon reading your post again, I see what you mean about selecting more than one category - filters currently are applied (to non-premium members) singly in Strava and you're probably right - for some, such as CX races, that may not work.

    So, there's an invitation for someone to list all the bike types out there...!

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  • Correction : all serious road bikes were S/S or 'fixies' before freewheels and derailleurs...

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  • I'd love it if fixed gear could be added and any further info required to help your algorithms ie. power

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  • Fixed Gear category along with some type of algorithm developed in order to compute negative wattage based according to gear ratio would be amazing.

    18mph on a -7.4% average grade is slow as hell, but when resisting the pedals (fixed gear) is taken into consideration in order to control speed, there's a tremendous amount of "negative wattage" that's being put into said hill/segment/ride.

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  • @fetz First of all, I humbly say thank you.

    Also, it would be nice to have the ability to list certain things (like cogs for instance) in the "Gear" section so that we're aware of the miles/abuse that we put on a certain piece of equipment.

    At this point in time, I have to list it as a cassette. Minor inconvenience, I know, but all it takes is a few keystrokes and this can be a permanent feature on Strava.

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  • Totally agree! One problem, though: Brakes. A lot of fixed gear riders have and USE breaks. While I think that's very silly and defeats the purpose, a lot of people just dont get it.
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  • Which is where the "Report This Ride" feature will have to be used.

    Jesse, you and I both know that it's humanly impossible to go from 30mph to 0mph in no time flat on a fixed gear...and this is a symptom of brake assisted stopping. If said rider is listed as a fixed rider, but pulling stops like this, either he/she has legs as big as a house and no knees, or is using brakes. (I think this one is obvious.)

    I'll admit, I ride with a front brake for emergencies (pedestrians, vehicles, etc), but I'll also admit that I'm terrified of the day that I have to use it because I'm pretty sure I'm gonna have a dinner date with the pavement and an appointment with my dentist.

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  • Having a front break is A-ok, so long as you don't use it. I'm considering putting one on incase my chain were to snap. I find skidding much mre natural for emergencies and I'd run int confusion if I had a break.
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  • I am ok with adding things like track bike, cyclocross bike, cruiser, etc. Things that are completely different bicycles. But you people saying you should add options to put things like full sus, hardtail, carbon, steel, 10 speed, pennyfarthing, tire widths or whatever, is kind of stupid and ridiculous. That is where the little description box is handy, if you really feel the need to let people know whether your carbon pennyfarthing has a suspension fork or not. I saw also the people saying "we need the categories like full suspension so I can have a leaderboard for my fat arse so I can get some self esteem boost!!" Which is just stupid. Thats like if in a mtb race there were different categories on what size frame, wheel, and how much suspension you have. Cycling is not about people's gear being fair to eachother. The "bond" between how much money one person has or what sponsors they have etc etc is all a part of the sport, and howgood you are at it.

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  • Differing wheel sizes and gearings, and thus the effect on power, would be awesome.

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  • Having read some of these comments i've had to laugh - "Serious cyclists do not ride fixies". I dont want to start bashing people here because we're all enthusiasts (which is why we use the site) but come on. People with 'all the gear and no idea' dont ride fixies - they're the best form of winter training going if you live near any reasonable hills. I wish i was fit enough to do mine justice.

    I would love to see a calculation for wattage or energy used based on some different algorithms for a fixed wheel. I think when you look at the other types of bikes the differences are pretty simple to understand - the biggest single difference between a road or MTB is rolling resistance and also some aero affect. Going from this to a single speed fixed there are many more variables whenever the road is downhill - how fast would you expect to go if you freewheeled and how many watts do you have to produce to hold a steady speed for example. This type of calculation would be an excellent addittion.

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  • Support for "fatbikes" (like the Surly Pugsley and Salsa Mukluk) would be very nice to see.

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  • Nice thread, great comments.  I too support the ability to add information about  the bike you are riding to assist in power calcs (sprockets/gear inches, or some other measurement as per Sheldon Brown).

     

    I do a lot of interval training and use my fixie for strength.  At times I accelerate from zero up to 50kph on my 68" over a short distance.  I know this takes a lot of power (my legs tell me so), but Strava doesn't pick this up as it has no idea of the gear I am using.  I suspect it thinks that I am constantly changing up.  Doing this kind of exercise under controlled conditions I generate over 1000W.  Strava is lucky if it tells me I generate above 300W.

     

    So, I'm a +1 for a way to input the bike cassette/chainring/wheel size settings and for Strava to calculate power using this.

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  • I would vote for a simple "road" versus "trail" split.  This also applies to running

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