Effort Comparison - Plot momentary speed instead of time lag

Instead of presenting the accumulated time lag, calculate the average speed of each sub-segment (total length divided by 20, for example, or a minimal track length to produce meaningful results).

The problem with the current time lag is that the segment is not uniform, one section can have a certain grade, followed by a steeper grade. Trying to compare 2 riders, it would appear that the slower rider is gaining on the faster rider when the slow rider is still on the less steep section, while the faster is slowing. It would be more valuable to see the difference in the fast section and slow sections.

The X axis would remain the distance on the segment, but there will be a plot for each rider, representing the localized sub-segment speed. Maybe the user could choose the sub segment size, based on the quality of the plot (small segments are ideal, but depends on the GPS update rate and accuracy, the outcome might be very jittery).

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  • I like the way it is although it seems you might be interpreting it wrong. From my understanding with the graph, each time gap is localized to the position the "key" cyclist is in. So if say the key cyclist has an 8 second time gap at a certain point, that's the time gap when the trailing cyclist arrives at that point.

     

    I find that ideal although obviously the race style visualization where everyone is moving on the map might confuse things since that will show their position strictly to the point in time. 

     

    Personally I think your suggestion of multiple sub segments is unnecessary and probably harder to digest.

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  • here is the problem I am trying to solve: I am comparing myself with a faster rider, which already gain a gap ahead of me. I have my strength and weaknesses, so I am trying to get a picture where I am losing the most time, a tight corner, a steep climb, a sprint section, etc. My goal is to mark the segments that I am slower on, in order to target them for training, and on a fast changing track, it is currently impossible. The time lag plot shows that in some segment I was faster, since the slope is negative, while I was actually slower, but at the same time the faster rider was already in a slower segment ahead.

    The time lag system is nice to simulate a race, or comparing a homogeneous segment, but would definitely not work for analyzing an enduro race for example.

    Maybe an easier solution would be the ability to mark dynamic A and B points on the segment, and show the times it took each rider to reach from A to B.

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  • What I'm saying is, if you see a dip on the graph, you're going faster at the EXACT SAME position of the key (top) rider. If you see a rise in the graph, you're going slower at the EXACT SAME position of the key (top) rider. Trust me it works, you're interpreting the time lag totally wrong.

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  • I see my mistake now. I guess that the negative slopes were caused by the GPS inaccuracies. I am certain that I was not faster at any point, so i tried to find a logical explanation.

    Thank you for your replies and for clarifying how it works. 

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  • This is the kind of thing I would like to see. The ability to compare my own run vs either another one of my runs on the same course, or another run, where instead of plotting time difference as a function of distance, I want to see speed as a function of distance (or more precisely, as a function of the proportion of the course completed).

    Effectively this corresponds to a plot of the gradient of the lines as they are currently shown

    The main problem with the current chart is that

    1) the differences in line gradient are too small to observe accurately

    2) The map shows the positions of the runners at a specific time, but the x-axis of the chart is in km, so the highlighted map positions don't correspond with the position of the runner intersected by the vertical cursor line on the chart, thus rendering such a comparison completely useless.

     3) You can't tell from the chart whether an increase in the gap is because you were running more slowly or that the other person was running more quickly.

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